Social Security Administration, Office of Policy: 2001 Customer Satisfaction Survey, Final Report

Prepared by The Gallup Organization, 901 F Street, NW, Washington, D.C. 20004
December 21, 2001

Q16: Now thinking about the statistical tables that you received from SSA in the past 24 months, how satisfied were you with the following aspects of the information?

This bar chart shows levels of satisfaction with seven aspects of the information received from statistical tables. For each aspect or bar in the chart, the percent "very satisfied" and the percent "somewhat satisfied" are presented in the bar. The seven aspects are then presented in order, from the longest bar (highest total satisfaction, when "very" and "somewhat" are added) to the shortest bar (lowest total satisfaction). The results are presented in the following table.

In regard to "accuracy," 65.5 percent were "very satisfied" and 23.1 percent were "somewhat satisfied." The comparable satisfaction ratings for the other 6 aspects were as follows: for "usefulness," 36.8 percent very satisfied and 48.5 percent somewhat satisfied; for "objectivity," 61.3 percent and 23.7 percent; for "clarity," 44.5 percent and 39.9 percent; for "comprehensiveness," 37.7 percent and 39.8 percent; for "up to date," 31.6 percent and 42.3 percent; and for "easy to find," 26.0 percent and 43.1 percent.

Q17: Now thinking about the analytical articles or reports that you received from SSA in the past 24 months, how satisfied were you with the following aspects of the information?

This bar chart shows levels of satisfaction with seven aspects of the information received from analytical articles or reports. For each aspect or bar in the chart, the percent "very satisfied" and the percent "somewhat satisfied" are presented in the bar. The seven aspects are then presented in order, from the longest bar (highest total satisfaction, when "very" and "somewhat" are added) to the shortest bar (lowest total satisfaction). In regard to "accuracy," 53.0 percent were "very satisfied" and 33.9 percent were "somewhat satisfied." The comparable satisfaction ratings for the other 6 aspects were as follows: for "clarity," 38.6 percent very satisfied and 44.5 percent somewhat satisfied; for "usefulness," 32.0 percent and 49.1 percent; for "objectivity," 49.8 percent and 31.1 percent; for "comprehensiveness," 30.9 percent and 46.8 percent; for "up to date," 28.9 percent and 44.8 percent; and for "easy to find," 24.9 percent and 46.5 percent.

Q18: Thinking now about specific SSA publications, please indicate how satisfied you were, overall, with each of the following publications that you used during the past 24 months?

This bar chart shows levels of satisfaction with ten publications among those who had used the publications in the previous two years. Each publication is represented by a bar, composed of two parts: the percent "very satisfied" with the publication and the percent "somewhat satisfied." The publications are listed in the chart in the order of total satisfaction (very and somewhat satisfied combined). The ten publications and the two satisfaction ratings for each are as follows: for the Social Security Bulletin, 39.9 percent very satisfied and 43.4 somewhat satisfied; for the Annual Statistical Supplement, 41.8 percent and 40.8 percent; for Fast Facts and Figures About Social Security, 44.1 percent and 37.2 percent; for the SSI Annual Statistical Report, 35.1 percent and 39.6 percent; for Income of the Aged Chartbook, 37.8 percent and 36.5 percent; for Social Security Programs in the U.S., 29.9 percent and 41.5 percent; for Income of the Population 55 or Older, 34.3 percent and 37.1 percent; for SSI Recipients by State and County, 33.4 percent and 36.6 percent; for OASDI Beneficiaries by State and County, 30.9 percent and 34.7 percent; and for Social Security Programs Throughout the World, 29.2 percent and 34.8 percent.

Q6: Do you have a professional interest in any of the topics below?

This bar chart shows the percent of respondents who were professionally interested in the eight topics listed in Question 6: 92.3 percent were interested in current programs or proposals for change; 81.9 percent were interested in the economic well-being of the aged or disabled; 78.1 percent were interested in work-related issues; 70.8 percent were interested in the economic impact of the Social Security or SSI programs; 62.7 percent were interested in Social Security financing issues; 52.0 percent were interested in other government income security programs; 46.8 percent were interested in private sources of income security; and 41.3 percent were interested in income security systems in other countries. Some respondents also checked the "other-specify" category. Several topic areas were coded from these "other" responses: 4.0 percent interested in Medicare/Medicaid and health-related issues; 3.3 percent interested in other specific program provisions; 2.2 percent interested in other disability-related issues; 2.2 percent interested in issues related to children; 2.0 percent interested in benefits and equity issues;1.2 percent interested in demographic or economic issues. Finally, 4.2 percent of responses were too diverse to code in separate categories and are shown here as a residual category, "other."

Q7: Are particularly interested in any of the subgroups below?

This bar chart shows the percent of respondents who expressed particular interest in certain subgroups listed in Question 7: 63.7 percent indicated particular interest in disabled adults; 55.9 percent interested in women; 55.2 percent interested in low wage workers; 54.8 percent interested in racial or ethnic minorities; 53.7 percent interested in disabled children; 47.5 percent interested in older workers; 39.4 percent interested in early retirees; 36.3 percent interested in the oldest old (age 85+); 36.1 percent interested in immigrants or non-citizens; and 34.0 percent interested in widowed, divorced, or never married persons. In addition, 7.7 percent of respondents identified some other group; these "other" responses, however, were too diverse to code into meaningful categories.

Q9: Please list the most important research or policy issues that you think SSA should be working on in the next year or two (multiple responses allowed)

This bar chart shows the topics or issues most frequently mentioned in response to Question 9, the most important research or policy issues for SSA's near-term agenda: 20.2 percent noted Social Security reform proposals as most important; 14.7 percent noted financing and solvency issues; 14.4 percent noted work incentives; 12.8 percent noted issues regarding specific policies or provisions; 9.7 percent noted other disability or disability program issues; 8.1 percent noted income security issues; 7.5 percent noted issues related to aging or retirement; 7.1 percent noted equity or group issues; 6.4 percent noted issues concerning disability definition; 6.3 percent noted maintaining or strengthening SSA's programs; 5.4 percent noted issues regarding disabled children; 4.4 percent noted health care and insurance issues; 4.3 percent noted demographic issues; 2.1 percent noted non-SSA sources of income; 2.0 percent noted each of the following--data issues, educating the public about SSA programs, and issues concerning the baby boomers; 1.7 percent noted services for the aged and disabled; 1.4 percent noted economic issues; 1.4 percent noted employment and earnings issues; and 1.3 percent noted mental health issues. Another 10.4 percent of responses were too diverse to be coded into meaningful categories and are reported here as a residual category, "other."

Q20: Please list any recommendations you have for improving Social Security's research, statistical, or policy products and services. (multiple responses allowed)

This bar chart shows percentage responses to the open-ended question asking for recommendations for improving SSA's research, statistical, or policy products and services. Many respondents made no recommendations: 43.2 percent didn't respond, and 15.7 percent explicitly indicated that they had no recommendations. Recommendations that could be grouped into categories were as follows: 11.6 percent wanted additional information in particular topic areas; 4.7 percent were for better dissemination of information; 4.2 percent for improving the Website; 4.2 percent for making information easier to comprehend; 3.9 percent for more timely information; 3.7 percent for publicizing what's available; 3.5 percent for making SSA data more accessible; 2.7 percent volunteered positive comments about SSA's research and analysis; 2.3 percent wanted more input from outside SSA; 2.2 percent were for more international data; 2.2 percent for more data by state or county; 1.5 percent volunteered negative comments; and 1.2 percent recommended more SSA staff. An additional 4.9 percent of responses were too diverse to be coded into meaningful categories and are reported here as a residual category, "other."

Q20: (Decisionmakers Only) Please list any recommendations you have for improving Social Security's research, statistical or policy products and services. (multiple responses allowed)

This bar chart shows percentage responses to Question 20 from a particular sample group: the small group of "decisionmakers" (N=45). In this group, 51.1 percent did not respond to the question and 11.1 percent indicated that they had no recommendations. Recommendations that could be grouped into categories are as follows: 13.3 percent of the decisionmakers recommended more timely information; 11.1 percent wanted additional information in particular topic areas; 6.7 percent wanted information more easy to comprehend; 4.4 percent were for better dissemination of information, and the same percent wanted data more accessible; 2.2 percent volunteered positive comments, and the same percent of respondents (2.2 percent) volunteered negative comments, wanted more input from outside SSA, and wanted more international data. Finally, 2.2 percent of the responses were unclear and couldn't be coded.