Research and Analysis by Janice M. Dykacz

Return of Disabled-Worker Beneficiaries to the DI Program: Some Insights From the New Beneficiary Followup
from Social Security Bulletin, Vol. 61 No. 2 (released April 1998)
by Janice M. Dykacz

Beneficiaries in the DI program may experience a recovery termination. What factors affect their reentitlement to DI benefits? Data from the New Beneficiary Followup was used to model return to the DI program. Those former beneficiaries who had vocational or job training and paid work after the recovery termination showed a lesser tendency to return to the DI program. Younger individuals and those in the highest primary insurance amount quartile also showed a lesser tendency to return.

Covariance Estimates for Regression Parameters from Complex Sample Designs: Application of the Weighted Maximum Likelihood Estimator to Linear and Logistic Regression Analysis in Which Observations Might Not be Independent
ORES Working Paper No. 62 (released September 1994)
by Barry V. Bye, Janice M. Dykacz, and Salvatore J. Gallicchio

Statistical methods of variance estimation are presented in this paper for the analysis of survey data involving complex sample designs. With certain complex sample design, estimation of the covariance matrices in linear and logistic regression is not straightforward. The design may be complex because of disproportionate sampling of strata, necessitating the use of weights, or because the observations are not independent, or possibly both. Examples are given from projects at the Social Security Administration, and computer programs written in SAS (Statistical Analysis System) are provided.

A Comparison of the Recovery Termination Rates of Disabled-Worker Beneficiaries Entitled in 1972 and 1985
from Social Security Bulletin, Vol. 56 No. 2 (released April 1993)
by John C. Hennessey and Janice M. Dykacz

Statistical Methodology for a Comparison of the Individual Characteristics and Death Rates of Disabled-Worker Beneficiaries Entitled in 1972 and 1985
ORES Working Paper No. 57 (released September 1992)
by John C. Hennessey and Janice M. Dykacz

This paper contains the technical details about the statistical methodology used in the article, "A Comparison of the Individual Characteristics and Death Rates of Disabled-Worker Beneficiaries Entitled in 1972 and 1985," published in the Fall 1992 issue of the Social Security Bulletin, vol. 55, no. 3. Logistic regression techniques were used to test for differences between the covariate distribution of the 1972 and the 1985 entitlement cohorts. Survival analysis techniques were used to model the death rates of the two cohorts.

Comparison of Individual Characteristics and Death Rates of Disabled-Worker Beneficiaries Entitled in 1972 and 1985
from Social Security Bulletin, Vol. 55 No. 3 (released July 1992)
by John C. Hennessey and Janice M. Dykacz

Medicare Costs Prior to Retirement for Disabled-Worker Beneficiaries
from Social Security Bulletin, Vol. 54 No. 4 (released April 1991)
by Barry V. Bye, Janice M. Dykacz, John C. Hennessey, and Gerald F. Riley

Postrecovery Experience of Disabled-Worker Beneficiaries
from Social Security Bulletin, Vol. 52 No. 9 (released September 1989)
by Janice M. Dykacz and John C. Hennessey

Projected Outcomes and Length of Time in the Disability Insurance Program
from Social Security Bulletin, Vol. 52 No. 9 (released September 1989)
by John C. Hennessey and Janice M. Dykacz

Estimation of Disability Status as a Single Latent Variable in a Model with Multiple Indicators and Multiple Causes
ORES Working Paper No. 26 (released April 1982)
by Barry V. Bye, Janice M. Dykacz, and Jesse M. Levy

In this paper, we are concerned with the underlying structure of self-definitions of disability. Our purpose is to identify the contribution of exertional and nonexertional impairment and the contributions of such nonmedical factors as age, sex, and education to the individuals' assessment of their own situations. On a statistical level, we seek to accomplish a substantial reduction of a large number of data items into a form that can be used conveniently in subsequent behavioral analyses.