SSA logo: link to Social Security Online home606. Medical and Other Evidence as Basis for Decision of “Not Disabled”

606.1 When does medical and other evidence alone establish that you are not disabled?

We will find that you are not disabled if the medical and other evidence in your case establishes that your impairment or combination of impairments is not severe. Your impairment(s) is not severe if it does not significantly limit your physical or mental ability to do basic work activities, such as: sitting, standing, walking, lifting, carrying, handling, reaching, pushing, pulling, climbing, stooping, crouching, seeing, hearing, speaking; understanding, carrying out, and remembering simple instructions; using judgment; responding appropriately to supervision, co-workers, and usual work situations; and dealing with changes in a routine work setting.

However, if we decide that your impairment is severe, we will continue to evaluate your claim to determine if you are disabled (see §§607 and §§608).

606.2 When does medical and other evidence establish that a child is not disabled under the SSI rules?

We will find that a child is not disabled under the SSI rules if the medical and other evidence in the child's case establishes that his or her impairment(s) is not severe. The child's impairment(s) is not severe if it is only a slight abnormality or a combination of slight abnormalities that causes no more than minimal functional limitations.

If we decide that your impairment(s) is severe, we will continue to evaluate your claim to determine whether you are disabled (see §§607 and 608)

Last Revised: Nov. 16, 2010